Check Out These Amazing Benefits of Charter Spectrum Internet Plans

Charter Spectrum offers a full suite of Internet, TV and Voice services for both business and residential customers. Charter Spectrum Internet is the fastest, most reliable Internet service you’ll find, and it comes with so many amazing benefits – such as no data caps and plenty of security offerings to keep your family safe – that you’ll simply be blown away.

Moreover, if you bundle Charter Spectrum Internet with other services, you can get access to the Internet for the stunningly low price! Click here to check the current Spectrum Internet Prices.

Charter Spectrum Internet offers faster speeds than anyone else

Want to stream full-length Hollywood movies without interruptions or glitches? Want to download as much music as you can? Or play graphics-intensive multi-player videogames with your friends? Then you better have the fastest Internet possible.

This is where Charter Spectrum Internet really delivers, with speeds starting at 60 Mbps. That speed is so fast it’s twenty times faster than DSL! That’s plenty of speed to support multiple devices in every room of your home. With that kind of speed, you will be able to have the total Internet experience.

No contracts when you order Charter Spectrum Internet

Remember when “signing up for cable” meant signing two-year contracts? Not anymore. Charter Spectrum Internet does not require you to sign a contract of any kind.

And, even better, Charter Spectrum Internet will spend up to $500 to buy out your existing Internet contract. So you never have to feel like you’re locked into an expensive contract over again?

No data caps with Charter Spectrum Internet

Charter Spectrum has your best Internet experience in mind, and that’s why there are no data caps for your Internet use. With other Internet providers, you might have to worry about how many movies you watch, how much music you download, or how long you spend playing your favorite videogame.

But not with Charter Spectrum! Your Internet use is completely uncapped – so feel free to binge on movies and enjoy the Internet the way you’ve always wanted to.

Convenient installation and best-in-class service

Charter Spectrum is changing the standard for Internet service, and one place where it’s starting is with an easy, no-hassle installation experience. It’s easy to install your Internet, and within minutes, you’ll have access to the fastest Internet speeds in your neighborhood!

Choosing a Charter Spectrum Internet plan for your family has never been easier

Charter Spectrum recognizes that families may have multiple devices hooked up to the Internet at one time, and that’s why a centerpiece of any Internet service plan is a fast in-home Wi-Fi network. That means family members can enjoy the Internet from every room of the home.

Experience the Charter Spectrum high-performance router

The key to your fast in-home Wi-Fi network is a high-performance router. And the Charter router gives you the speed and range that you need, in every room of your home. The signal is powerful enough to pass through walls and heavy furniture, so you can literally position it anywhere in your home.

Security and parental controls

Ever worried about what websites your kids might be visiting? Those worries are a thing of the past with the super-strong security and parental controls made possible by Charter Spectrum Internet. In fact, the Charter Security Suite that comes with each and every order of Charter Spectrum Internet is a $60 value.

Once installed, it gives you virus protection, malware protection, email inbox protection and plenty of parental controls so that you can block certain sites for your kids.

24/7 customer support

Have a question about installation or use of your Charter Spectrum Internet? You can get one-on-one advice anytime of the day or night with friendly, knowledgeable customer service agents from Charter Spectrum.

Unlike other Internet service providers, who often try to refer you to online FAQs or limit your calls to certain hours of the business day, Charter Spectrum is open for business every day and hour of the week!

Access to premium entertainment offerings

Charter Spectrum Internet pairs with Charter Spectrum TV, giving you amazing access to premium entertainment offerings on any mobile device. You can watch live TV anywhere in your home with the Spectrum TV app. And you can stream all of your favorite shows on your mobile devices.

That opens up a world of possibilities. You can choose to watch one movie in the main living room, while other people in your family watch movies in their bedrooms!

If you are thinking of getting both TV and Internet, then you have three core options:

  • Triple Play Select – 125+ channels
  • Triple Play Silver – 175+ channels
  • Triple Play Gold – 200+ channels

When combined with the 60 Mbps Internet you are already getting from Charter Spectrum, you can just imagine the possibilities!

Unlock the true value of bundling Charter Spectrum Internet

If you’re looking to save money and get the most affordable version of home Internet, then it’s worth looking into the various bundles that are available from Charter Spectrum. Basic Internet starts at $44.99 per month. But if you bundle with other services, that price falls to a very affordable $29.99 per month.

Final wrap-up of everything Charter Spectrum Internet delivers

The key selling point of Charter Spectrum Internet is the perfect mix of speed and features. Plus, there are no contracts and no need to worry about getting locked into a long-term commitment. If you care about getting the fastest, safest, and most reliable Internet, then Charter Spectrum is the clear choice.

Sign up today!

Now is the time to sign up for Charter Spectrum Internet. If you’ve been putting off this decision, now is the time to give your family the fast, high-quality Internet they deserve. Plus, for a limited time only, Charter Spectrum is offering a 30-day money back guarantee. If, for any reason, you’re not completely satisfied with Charter Spectrum, you can cancel and get your full order amount back.

To get started, call this telephone number to order today: 1-855-345-0208

Underlying Issues Within the Charter/TWC Merger

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Anytime there’s a mega-merger of the kind that we saw with Charter and Time Warner Cable in 2016, there are bound to be underlying issues that take at least a few years to sort out. And that’s exactly what we’re seeing now. The mega-merger was finalized in May 2016, so we’ve had about 12 months to take a better view of how it will change the competitive landscape for cable TV and Internet services. Here are just a few of the issues involved.

#1: Monopoly and competition

The initial concern was that the Charter-Time Warner Cable combination was going to create a colossus – perhaps not as big as if Comcast had acquired TWC, but still a giant. The new Charter Spectrum is now the second-largest cable TV and Internet provider in the world, trailing only Comcast.

On a combined basis, Charter Spectrum and Comcast are huge. It’s not overstating things to call Comcast and Charter Spectrum a near-duopoly. On a combined basis, the two companies reach 80% of U.S. homes, and their competitive footprints are both national, stretching from California to Texas to New York and Florida. Chances are, wherever you live in America, you are within the service area of one of these 2 companies.

And that still has some people very concerned. Back in 2014-2015, as Charter started to put together its bid for Time Warner Cable, this was one of the biggest issues to address. Consumers feared that the behemoth cable provider would decrease competition, and potentially put an end to true innovation. Instead, skeptics said, the combined company would simply try to wring additional profits out of existing infrastructure and products.

#2: Net neutrality

On a related note, there was also concern about how the new merger would impact net neutrality. The fundamental principle of net neutrality is that the Internet should be a free and open place, where there is no “fast lane” and “slow lane” for traffic. In other words, the big cable providers shouldn’t get to determine that certain traffic will be “throttled” – or that some edge providers (like Netflix) should be forced to pay fees to connect their customers. As a condition of the merger, Charter promised that it would not charge companies like Netflix for improved delivery of content.

And, indeed, one of the big issues that came up during the Charter-TWC merger was how well Charter would respect these principles of net neutrality. Thus far, the signs have been favorable. In fact, Charter has signed a three-year agreement to respect net neutrality and the open Internet. And, at least publicly, Charter has commented on how important Netflix is to its future growth. Of course, Netflix helped to stymie the Comcast-TWC deal a year earlier, so it’s easy to see why Charter is bending over backwards to “play nice” with Netflix.

#3: Customer service

One of the key selling points of the merger was that it was going to dramatically improve customer service. That’s because Time Warner Cable was routinely cited as having poor customer service. People loved to hate TWC and comment on how old and inefficient everything about the company was. Even worse, TWC had pushed a lot of its customer call centers offshore, and that angered customers even more. In customer satisfaction surveys, TWC always performed poorly.

That’s why Charter has been very upfront and direct about improving customer service. Charter pledged to move all the customer call centers back to the U.S. AND hire as many as 20,000 new customer service representatives. That might sound like a very expensive endeavor, but as Charter explains, it’s crucial to reduce the churn in customers. And it also improves the company’s ability to up-sell customers into higher-priced offerings. For example, with good customer service, a call that might have ended previously with loud disagreements and shouting might now end with the customer happily moving into a higher-priced package.

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#4: Rebranding as Spectrum

People might not realize it, but Spectrum is a completely new brand that was created for the merger. One major goal of the Spectrum rebranding is to get every part of the company using the same logo and the same brand identity. It would be confusing to have one part of the company known as Charter, one part of the company known as Time Warner Cable, and one part of the company known as Bright House Networks.

And, to be honest, the new branding enables Charter to get rid of the Time Warner Cable name forever. That brand had been eroding in the minds of customers, and it still evoked the notion of “the cable guy.” People associated the brand name Time Warner Cable with poor service, long delays, poor quality and just a lot of problems. So Spectrum helps to gloss over the fact that it’s still the same company. If you think about it, Charter bought Time Warner Cable as much for its existing customer base as for its existing infrastructure.

There are a lot of changes planned to make every part of the company very efficient and customer-friendly, and it all starts with the rebranding as Spectrum. This rebranding will impact every customer touch point. For example, it will change the names and logos on billing, screen guides and advertising. In New York City, you used to see Time Warner Cable trucks heading uptown and downtown – now you’ll see trucks with the Charter Spectrum branding on them. At first, it may take some getting used to, but it’s all part of creating one, unified brand identity across all geographies.

#5: Development of improved national broadband infrastructure

Going forward, a major goal of the merger will be to completely overhaul Time Warner Cable’s aging infrastructure. The near-term goal is to create an all-digital operation by getting rid of any analog infrastructure. That will enable the company to offer more innovative services, including the build out of the much-touted 5G infrastructure. In Florida, for example, Charter Spectrum plans to start 5G field trials in Florida, making it the first U.S. cable company to lay the groundwork for 5G.

For the customer, all of these changes are a positive. For example, Charter Spectrum pledged that it would boost the minimum speed for all of its customers to at least 60 Mbps. And, going forward, Charter Spectrum Internet will be able to offer even faster speeds. But first things first – the goal is to get all Time Warner Cable customers up to a minimum speed.

#6: Streamlined pricing and packaging offers

Another major issue of the Charter-Time Warner Cable mega-merger was rationalizing and streamlining all the pricing and packaging offers. If you think about, it’s pretty confusing to the end customer to have too many choices. With Time Warner Cable, there were prices and tiers for all different kinds of connection speeds. People in Florida might have a whole set of offers and tiers different from those in New York City.

That may not sound like a big deal – but consider the following theoretical example… What if a Starbucks in Florida served different drinks and had different names for those drinks than a Starbucks in Manhattan? It would get pretty confusing for customers any time they traveled. And it would be harder for Starbucks to deal with suppliers – the company would have to order certain cups and ingredients for one region, and a completely different set of cups and ingredients for another region. See? It would be pretty confusing, so for larger companies, it always makes sense to streamline and consolidate.

So Charter Spectrum set out from the beginning to collapse all the prices and tiers into three basic levels: Select, Silver and Gold. That would make it easier to explain to customers what their options were, and it would also make it easier for Spectrum to use a single set of advertising materials for any location in the nation. In a best-case scenario, those cost savings and efficiencies could be passed on to the consumer in the form of cheaper prices.

So, as you can see, this huge mega-merger created a number of different issues that are still being resolved today. Most importantly, there were issues related to competition and the risks of monopoly-like behavior, due to the combined market size of the new company.

To overcome this problem, Charter Spectrum sought to improve customer service dramatically and also improve the overall level of service quality. At the same time, the company worked on a re-branding, and began the process of overhauling its aging infrastructure acquired from Time Warner Cable. The company is also working to address the issue of net neutrality, which has once again entered the spotlight as an important issue impacting the future development of digital broadband services.

The next step is the most exciting step – and that’s the rollout of innovative new services and products, including those made possible by the development of 5G Internet infrastructure. In a best-case scenario, that will lead to faster speeds, which everyone agrees is necessary for the next generation of online video screening (as well as whatever comes next).

Of course, a big merger doesn’t occur overnight. There are a lot of important steps that need to be taken over the next 12 months. But 2017 is shaping up to be a very important year for Charter Spectrum, especially as it develops the next generation of digital services. Spectrum has the opportunity to become a brand synonymous with high quality, great customer service and innovative products, all offered at a price point that’s attractive to consumers.

How Charter Spectrum Is Handling the Net Neutrality Debate

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For Charter Spectrum and other Internet service providers (ISPs), the debate over net neutrality is once again in the spotlight. In 2017, the new Trump administration has made it clear that it’s no fan of net neutrality, and new FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has made overturning net neutrality one of his primary strategic goals.

The very fact that the Trump administration is going to do all the dirty work of clearing away net neutrality will give cover to the cable companies to continue business as usual, all while secretly hoping for the day when they can start to monetize their vast broadband infrastructure. Already, articles are appearing in the media, suggesting that the cable companies are chipping away at net neutrality after giving lip service to it for several years.

Case in point: in April 2017, a controversial article in New York magazine – “We Already Know How Internet Providers Will Screw Us Over, Because They Did It Before” – basically outlined how the big cable companies were going to try to squeeze online video providers like Netflix, which now account for a huge proportion of total bandwidth provided by ISPs.

For Charter Spectrum, the article was particularly explosive because it featured the behind-the-scenes machinations of Time Warner Cable, which Charter Spectrum acquired in a massive $55 billion mega-merger. As the article pointed out, legal memos and correspondence have been leaked from the former Time Warner Cable, showing exactly what the company’s executives had in mind. The goal was to get content providers like Netflix to “pay up” for a direct connection to their customers.

If Netflix didn’t pay, then all their video traffic would be sent to the slow lane of the Internet, something that Time Warner Cable executives referred to as “through transit.” As long as Netflix didn’t pay up to use the TWC broadband infrastructure, Netflix customers would experience very slow buffering times for videos, and would probably conclude that this bad overall experience was the fault of Netflix. Time Warner Cable, of course, never planned to divulge its role in slow video speeds.

So let’s back up for a second and set the stage for Charter Spectrum in terms of the upcoming debate over net neutrality in 2017. The huge cable company – which now accounts for nearly 15 percent of all cable and satellite TV subscribers and 22 percent of all broadband customers – will likely direct its efforts in two directions:

  • Making sure that it abides by its net neutrality commitments agreed to as terms of the huge Charter-Time Warner Cable merger
  • Making clear that it is still publicly committed to net neutrality, even as the FCC moves to dismantle the open Internet

At a quick glance, you can see that framing the debate around (1) is much easier than framing the debate around (2).

Before Charter Communications was allowed to merge with Time Warner Cable, it had to abide by some fairly onerous net neutrality commitments. The logic was simple: if you want to buy up a company for $55 billion, then you better play nice with everyone else on the Internet.

And, to be fair to Charter, the company was a model citizen ahead of the merger. In June 2015, a noted net neutrality advocate (Martin Ammori) outlined in WIRED magazine all the ways that Charter was committed to a free and open Internet. In fact, he says that he personally advised Charter on the right language to use, and that he was satisfied with Charter’s approach.

He offered a glowing recommendation of Charter as a model net neutrality advocate: “Charter is offering the strongest network neutrality commitment ever offered – in any merger or, to my knowledge, in any nation.” He followed that up by saying, “Charter is offering commitments that go further than any before.”

However, there was one little caveat, and that was the duration of the commitment. Charter was offering to abide by network neutrality commitments for 3 years. So you do the math – assuming the clock started in early 2016, when the merger was finalized, then that means Charter would be free to re-think its network neutrality commitment by 2019. That would give the FCC plenty of time (two years) to dismantle network neutrality, and provide plausible cover for Charter to change its stance. In doing so, Charter could simply point to changing competitive conditions in the industry.

By all indications, Charter proceeded with the Time Warner Cable merger in good faith. It fully intended to comply with network neutrality principles, and it proclaimed its commitment openly. In November 2015, just months before the merger was finalized, Hollywood Reporter reviewed all the ways that Charter was sticking by its network neutrality agreements. This included the following key points:

  • No blocking or throttling Internet traffic
  • Not engaging in paid prioritization
  • Not charging consumers additional fees to use third-party apps
  • Not imposing data caps on consumers
  • Not charging interconnection fees to edge providers (like Netflix)

Most notably, Charter went out of its way to embrace Netflix, saying that, “Foreclosure is the exact opposite of the strategy Charter has been pursuing.” Moreover, Charter noted that its plan to upgrade the speeds of its Internet customers acquired from Time Warner Cable would actually be in the best interests of Netflix – it would mean faster video playing times for all streaming content.

By all intents and purposes, then, Charter handled the net neutrality debate by showing that its interests were firmly aligned with Netflix’s. Charter wanted to grow its broadband infrastructure and boost speeds, and that favored Netflix. And Charter recognized that Netflix was the type of edge provider that it had to be careful with.

Remember – Netflix had opposed an earlier Comcast-Time Warner Cable deal, and had used net neutrality as a key part of its argument. Thus, from the perspective of Charter, Netflix was a very strong adversary that had to be respected. If Charter tried to take on Netflix directly, then it would mean the end of its merger with Time Warner Cable.

In April 2015, in fact, the popular tech blog Mashable wrote, “The Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger died because of Netflix.” The online video streaming giant directly petitioned the FCC to block the merger. Netflix CEO Reed Hastings told Wall Street analysts that his major goal was to “block” Comcast’s proposed $45 billion merger with Time Warner Cable. When Comcast eventually walked away from the deal after losing the support of the FCC, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder called it a victory for “providers of content and streaming services who work to bring innovative products to consumers across America and around the world.”

So the writing was on the wall for Charter in 2015 – play nice with Netflix, or there’s absolutely no way you’re going to get the merger done.

Which brings us to 2017. Charter’s merger with Time Warner Cable has been completed, and the final rebranding as Charter Spectrum is now a done deal. Heading into the merger, Charter met all of its commitments, and was a model citizen in terms of driving forward the net neutrality debate. But now what?

The role of the FCC in the Trump administration obviously looms large. If you think about it, the FCC is giving ISPs like Charter the “perfect out.” If Charter sees that the public debate around network neutrality is shifting, then it makes it much easier to adapt its own business practices accordingly.

In terms of net neutrality, it now may make sense for Charter Spectrum to co-opt service providers like Netflix by providing its own competing services. And, indeed, that’s what we’re starting to see with all of the biggest cable giants. They are introducing their own streaming services, making it easier to share content across devices even when out of the home, and making it highly advantageous to bundle cable TV with Internet due to all the possible synergies involving streaming content.

And, if anything, Netflix’s dominant role in the world of streaming video is eroding. When Netflix took on Comcast, it was close to its peak in terms of market strength. It could dictate the terms of any deal. But now look around you – there are so many flourishing streaming services that Netflix can no longer say that cable companies are responsible for anti-competitive market practices. In addition to Netflix, there’s Sling TV, Hulu, Amazon Prime Now and a whole host of specialty streaming services.

This new, shifting competitive landscape is going to change the debate around net neutrality. For one, it will make it easier for Charter Spectrum to make the case that it is a champion of net neutrality. And it will make it easier to appease the regulators: anyone questioning the Charter-Time Warner deal will have a tough time proving that the merger was bad for consumers.

The true test will come when Charter Internet and other ISPs begin to invest heavily in new infrastructure. How can they get companies like Netflix to help pay some of the costs, without actually charging them for it directly? In many ways, it’s like asking Mexico to help build a border wall – and then asking Mexico to pay for it. Nobody is going to do that unless there’s an awful lot of arm-twisting. But since the battle over net neutrality plays out in public, all of that arm-twisting is going to be up to the lobbyists in Washington.

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How Customers Perceive Charter Spectrum’s Rebranding

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When Charter Communications completed its acquisition of Time Warner Cable in 2016, the plan was to push through a massive rebranding that would quickly replace the much-maligned Time Warner Cable brand with a new, more modern brand: Spectrum. The essence of the Spectrum brand was supposed to be “better service at a better price,” all backed by much-improved customer service.

To make that a reality, Charter Communications focused on several key steps:

(1) Stripping away the Time Warner name from all billings, advertising and mailings

(2) Boosting the Internet speeds of all customers to a base level of at least 60 Mbps

(3) Reducing a confusing mix of incentives, programs, plans and offers into just a few core offerings (Select, Silver, Gold)

(4) Revamping customer service by hiring nearly 20,000 customer service representatives and bringing call centers back to the U.S.

The first leg of the rebranding launched in September 2016, with a rollout to Texas and California markets. That was followed by a rebranding in New York and Florida. Finally, the company rolled out the rebranding to the Midwest, including Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and Wisconsin.

If this were a business school case study, it would be a textbook example of how to achieve a rebranding. Any corporate strategist would tell you that you can’t accomplish a massive national rebranding overnight, and that a staged process would make sense. And those same corporate strategist would also probably tell you that any brand needs to be easily defined in terms of a few basic principles. And here the “better service at a better price” brand offer seemed to make sense.

And, just to make sure that the rebranding efforts hit all major demographic groups, Charter Spectrum also rolled out a marketing campaign specifically targeted to Hispanic and Spanish-speaking populations in Texas and California. Again, that’s a perfectly logical step designed to maximize consumer awareness of the new brand.

So, nearly 9 months after the rebranding effort started, how has Charter Spectrum done? It’s too early to see the effect of the rebranding in terms of customer satisfaction surveys (where Time Warner typically scored extremely low), but it is possible to check out some of the chatter on branding blogs and cable TV blogs. And it’s here that it’s possible to really see how customers perceive Charter Spectrum’s rebranding.

Let’s go back to the four major components of the rebranding to see how Charter Spectrum has delivered. To see how well the rebranding has gone, we can compare what the company initially set out to achieve with what the customer response has been thus far.

#1: Stripping away the Time Warner name from all billings, advertising and mailings

From the outset, it could be expected that this move might be confusing for customers. If you’ve been a long-time Time Warner Cable customer for years, what are you going to think when you start to see cable trucks emblazoned with “Spectrum” zipping through your city? In many ways, Time Warner was always a brand that people loved to hate. As much as people complained about Time Warner, it was still a company with a long, distinguished pedigree. And it wasn’t always clear to people why the Time Warner name lived on for some cable TV content assets (like CNN), while Time Warner Cable simply disappeared.

And there was one more problem here, and one that perhaps could have been avoided. When customers had a problem, they were used to calling a certain number to complain. But when the rebranding took effect, it suddenly became difficult to figure out who to call. If you read the customer comments on blogs, one important point that emerged was that some customers were both confused and angry that their old customer service numbers simply disappeared.

But remember – Charter Spectrum was also in the process of closing down overseas call centers and moving them to the U.S. So it perhaps only made sense that the process of transitioning to new customer service call centers was perhaps harder than expected. Plus, as noted above, Charter Spectrum was in the midst of hiring 20,000 new customer service reps and teaching them a new sales script.

#2: Boosting the Internet speeds of all customers to a base level of at least 60 Mbps

This should have been a clear customer win for Charter Spectrum.It meant that some customers automatically saw their Charter Internet speeds increase overnight, all at no additional cost. In terms of customer perceptions, this should have seen an outpouring of support from disgruntled customers. They should have been praising Spectrum, right?

Not so fast. The problem is that Time Warner Cable had been quietly boosting the Internet speeds of some customers to 100 Mbps and even 300 Mbps. There were so many Time Warner cable programs and price tiers, that there were actually more customers than might have been expected who were getting faster speeds than 60 Mbps.

Moreover, they were often getting special promotional pricing for those speeds. Once those promotional periods came to an end, they suddenly found out that there would be an “activation fee” to keep those higher speeds. As some angry customers pointed out on blogs, they felt “exploited” and they were angry about paying activation speeds of up to $200 ($200!) to keep those super-fast 300 Mbps connection speeds.

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#3: Reducing a confusing mix of incentives, programs, plans and offers into just a few core offerings

This, too, should have been a slam dunk win for Charter Spectrum. If you’ve ever seen all the programs, tiers and offers from Time Warner Cable, it would have made your head spin. So Charter Communications did what it thought was best – it “rationalized” all those plans into several core plans – Select, Silver and Gold. Charter thought it was making the lives of its customers easier, not harder. All of a sudden, a very complex choice about which cable TV package to choose became very simple.

But, again, theory and reality did not always go hand in hand. One big problem was that customers actually enjoyed the idea of negotiating with the cable company and feeling like they had won. When they called up and were told that legacy pricing was no longer available, and that they didn’t have as many choices, customers responded by blaming the “monopoly” pricing power of a huge cable giant. And, even worse, customer service reps were given a script to stick to. At times, there were “hidden” options not on that script and customers, indeed, wanted them.

It would be as if you walked into your corner Starbucks and your favorite drink that you’ve been ordering for months was no longer available. Your favorite barista still knew how to make it, but they weren’t allowed to give it to customers. Just imagine how your opinion about Starbucks might change after that.

#4: Revamping customer service

This was perhaps the biggest win for Charter Spectrum. Let’s face it – the customer service at Time Warner was abysmal. And part of the rebranding was meant to gloss over the fact that this was still the same company. But here Charter Spectrum really put its money on the line. Hiring 20,000 customer service reps is a big step. And the company really tried to reinvent itself as a friendly, customer-centric company.

Several branding blogs (including Brand Channel) even pointed out that Charter was redoubling its efforts in the local community. One big winner with Charter had been “Charter Our Community” and so the company intended to bring that same community spirit to regions served by Time Warner Cable. One example was a video posted on YouTube of how a California mom was able to make important home repairs, all thanks to Charter. As Charter establishes itself as a brand in these local communities, the sort of word-of-mouth buzz that’s possible from these efforts should not be underestimated.

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At the end of the day, any rebranding takes time. And keep in mind – Charter is the second-largest cable company these days (trailing only Comcast) with a huge national footprint. It’s not a case of an upstart brand changing its logo and “pivoting” to a new customer segment. In the case of Charter Communications, it meant a re-thinking of every single Time Warner Cable touch point with customers, in very diverse markets. The same branding message that might go over well with customers in Los Angeles or New York might not resonate as well with customers in Ohio and Wisconsin. And any increase in price – even if it meant significantly faster speeds or better service – would be seen by customers as proof that they were being exploited.

After summer 2017, we’ll have a much better view of how the rebranding went. The multi-stage rebranding across all geographic markets will be complete, and the first customer service satisfaction ratings should start to be available. If all goes according to plan, customers will view Spectrum as a progressive, modern brand that offers crystal-clear HD picture, a fully-featured voice service, and the fastest possible Internet — all without a confusing mix of tiers, programs, offers and incentives. That will give Charter Spectrum a solid base to build out its broadband infrastructure and continue to offer its national customers the most innovative product offerings possible.

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