Morganfield, McKinley

Portrait
Born: Apr 04, 1915 AD
Died: 1983 AD, at 68 years of age.

Nationality: American
Categories: Guitarist, Musicians


1915 – He was born this year in Morganfield in Issaquena County, Mississippi.

 

1918 – His grandmother Della Grant raised him after his mother died this year.

 

1940 – He moved to St. Louis before playing with Silas Green a year later and returning to Mississippi.

 

1941 – In the summer of this year, Alan Lomax came to Stovall, Mississippi, on behalf of the Library of Congress to record various country blues musicians. 

 

1943 – He headed north to Chicago in hopes of becoming a full-time professional. He lived with a relative for a short period while driving a truck and working in a factory by day and playing at night.

 

1945 – His uncle gave him his first electric guitar, which enabled him to be heard above the noisy crowds.

 

1947 – He played guitar with Sunny land Slim on piano on the cuts “Gypsy Woman” and “Little Anna Mae.”

 

1948 – His “I Can’t Be Satisfied” and “I Feel like Going Home” became big and his popularity in clubs began to take off.

 

1958 – The Big Bill Broonzy was the leading bluesman in Chicago until his death and the city was a very competitive market for a newcomer to become established.

 

1964 - Waters cut a two-sided gem for Chess, "The Same Thing"/"You Can't Lose What You Never Had," that boasted a distinct 1950s feel in its sparse, reflexive approach. Most of his subsequent Chess catalog, though, is fairly forgettable. Worst of all were two horrific attempts to make him a psychedelic icon.

 

1969 - Partially salvaging this barren period in his discography was the "Fathers and Sons" project, for Chess, which paired Muddy Waters and Spann with local youngbloods Paul Butterfield and Mike Bloomfield in a multigenerational celebration of legitimate Chicago blues.

 

2004 – He was ranked #17 in Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

Page last updated: 2:43pm, 14th Jul '07
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