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McClintock, Barbara

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Born: 1902 AD
Died: 1992 AD, at 90 years of age.

Nationality: American
Categories: Biologists, Cytogeneticist, Scientist

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1902 - Barbara McClintock, born on the 16th of June in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. She was a pioneering American scientist and one of the world's most distinguished cytogeneticists.

1919 - Attended High School at Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn, New York.

1923 - Graduated with BA Botany, at Cornell University.

1925 - Graduated with MA Botany, at Cornell University.

1927 - 1931 - She studied at Cornell, where she later taught as Assistant Professor of Genetics.

1927 - Graduated with PhD Botany, at Cornell University.

1936 - 1940 - Became Professor of University of Missouri at Columbia.
  
1940 - Working at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, she discovered and studied a new class of mutant genes in corn, concluding that the function of some genes is to control other genes, and that they can move on the chromosome to do this.

1957 - She received funding from the National Science Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation sponsored her to start research on maize in South America, an area that is rich in varieties of this species.

1965 - 1974 - Became a Professor together with Andrew D. White Professor-at-Large, at Cornell University.

1970 - She was awarded the National Medal of Science.

1981 - The first MacArthur Laureate Award.

1983 - Received the first unshared Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to be awarded to a woman.
      
       - A biography which detailed her pioneering work A Feeling for the Organism appeared.

1986 - She was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame.

1992 - Died near Cold Spring Harbor in Huntington, New York, on the 2nd of September at the age of 90; she never married or had children.





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Page last updated: 10:14am, 18th Apr '07

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