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Bowen, Elizabeth Dorothea Cole

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Born: 1899 AD
Died: 1973 AD, at 73 years of age.

Nationality: Irish
Categories: Novelists

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1899 - Born on June 7th in Dublin, Ireland. Anglo-Irish author Elizabeth Bowen employed a finely wrought prose style in fictions frequently detailing uneasy and unfulfilling relationships among the upper-middle class.

1938 - 'The Death of the Heart', the title of one of her most highly praised novels, might have served for most of them.

1949-1968 - Her novels include Encounters; The Hotel; The Last September; Friends and Relations; To the North; The House in Paris; The Death of the Heart; The Heat of the Day; A World of Love; The Little Girls; The Good Tiger; and Eva Trout.

         - Her short story collections include Ann Lee’s and Other Stories; Joining Charles and Other Stories; The Cat Jumps and Other Stories; The Demon Lover and Other Stories; Stories by Elizabeth Bowen; and A Day in the Dark and Other Stories.

         - Her non-fiction includes Look At All Those Roses; Bowen’s Court; Seven Winters: Memories of a Dublin Childhood; Anthony Trollope: A New Judgement; Why Do I Write: An Exchange of Views between Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene and V.S. Pritchett; Collected Impressions; The Shelbourne: A Centre in Dublin Life for More Than A Century; A Time in Rome; Afterthought: Pieces About Writing; and The Mulberry Tree.

1973 - Died of cancer on February 22nd in Hythe.

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Page last updated: 11:35pm, 21st Aug '07

  • "'Tis said of love that it sometimes goes, sometimes flies; runs with one, walks gravely with another; turns a third into ice, and sets a fourth in a flame: it wounds one, another it kills: like lightning it begins and ends in the same moment: it makes that fort yield at night which it besieged but in the morning; for there is no force able to resist it."
  • "No object is mysterious. The mystery is in your eye."
  • "The heart may think it knows better: the senses know that absence blots people out. We really have no absent friends. The friend becomes a traitor by breaking, however unwillingly or sadly, out of our own zone: a hard judgment is passed on him, for all the pleas of the heart."
  • "It is in this unearthly first hour of spring twilight that earth's almost agonized livingness is most felt. This hour is so dreadful to some people that they hurry indoors and turn on the lights."